Monday 24 July 2017

Short Observations

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JMH International Essays — Announcement

Original Essays on the Psychology of Anger and/or Violence 

We thank all those who have submitted an essay to the JMH International Prize Essay Contest. As of now, February 1, 2017, we have decided not to continue with the contest.

For those who feel they have an important contribution to the subject of the Psychology of Anger and/or Violence, please feel free to submit your essay with the form provided here. If the judges agree that the essay is a significant contribution, we will publish it here (subject to agreement with the author).

We include here links related to past essays — For the 2014 contest, click here for the summary article and here for the list of winners; for the 2015 contest, click here for the summary article and the list of winners; and for the 2016 contest, click here.

Longer Observations

Mental Problems

  • am I crazy?

  • Clinical

  • Dear Reader who is a Batterer

    Dear Reader who is a Batterer,

    (This note is definitely not meant as a replaced for psychotherapy! It is a thought that might possible be useful for some people, some of the time, who are already working on this problem in psychotherapy.)

    This is a note to people who:

    1) have impulses to assault and battery

    2) struggle with these impulses, because they think they are bad, and still have trouble controlling them, and

    3) whose abuses are minor on a scale of 1-10 —

    (There are many degrees of abuse. Some abuse is tolerated by society and is not illegal. Some is socially acceptable and even encouraged. In this last class are some forms of emotional and verbal abuse that people feel is funny or strong. People who stand up to these "minor" forms of abuse are often considered to be "overly sensitive." —

    (This note to batterers assumes the reader will feel it is morally correct for him or her to seek help now and immediately with any abuse that even hints at severity to him or herself and/or others.)

  • Dear Reader who is a Pre-Batterer

    Dear Reader who is a Pre-Batterers,

    (This is not meant as a replacement for psychotherapy! but as a thought that might be helpful for certain people at certain times who are already working in therapy.)

    Here are some assumptions about batterers — people who have tendencies to hit people or animals (or yell at them or insult them, and the like) but who haven't done it yet.

  • Dear Reader with Ambivalence

  • Dear Reader with Ambivalence

    Dear Reader suffering from Ambivalence,

    (This is not meant as a replacement for psychotherapy! but as a thought that might be helpful for certain people at certain times who are already working in therapy.)

    The following presentation is taken from real life:

  • Dear Reader with Anxiety

  • Dear Reader with Anxiety

    Dear Reader with Anxiety,

    The following is one thing I think about anxiety, and it is only my opinion.

  • Dear Reader with Impulses to Batter

  • Dear Reader with Schizophrenia

  • Dear Reader with Schizophrenia

    Dear Reader with Schizophrenia,

    (This is not meant as a replacement for psychotherapy! but as a thought that might be helpful for certain people at certain times who are already working in therapy.)

    Just because you don't smell yourself or don't think you smell bad, doesn't mean others don't smell you or that others don't think you smell bad.

  • Dear Reader: Can Psychotherapy Help?

    Dear Reader: Can Psychotherapy Help?

    We all have problems. Psychology has become very popular. Sometimes it is easy to slip into the idea that psychology can solve all our problems, but it obviously can't. On the other hand, I think there is no problem that can't be looked at from a psychological angle, and often this angle can open new doors and avenues.

  • Dear Reader: Can Psychotherapy Help?

  • Film & Stage: Phantom of the Opera: A Psychological Review

    Phantom of the Opera: A Psychological Review

    Phantom of the Opera has been playing on Broadway for twenty five years now which makes it the longest running play in the history of Broadway. It has been seen by over one hundred and thirty million people, world-wide. It is a phenomenon, a spectacle. It is tempting for a psychologist to wonder, "Why?"

  • Film & Stage: Silence of the Lambs

    The Silence of the Lambs: A Psychological Review

    Psychologists are not trained to evaluate the artistic merits of a film, but we may try to analyze a film very much as we analyze other products of the human psyche such as dreams or myths. In fact, a film, in so far as it "grips" people, is a myth in action, and to comment on a film that fascinates its audience is to comment on a living myth, a snap-shot of the American psyche.

  • Genetic Engineering, the Two Genes: CACNA1C and CACNB2, and the DSM

    Genetic Engineering, the 2 Genes: CACNA1C and CACNB2, and the DSM

  • guess I'm on a dangerous path

  • healed, filled with life

  • Historical Comments on the Film, "A Dangerous Method"

    Historical Comments on the Film, "A Dangerous Method"

    {slider Letter to an Hollywood Agent about the Film}

    August 9, 1999

    Dear xxxx,

         Regarding: Sabina, script by Christopher Hampton

  • I see the answer to how to live

  • I'm all charged up

  • I'm remarkable

  • I'm right!

  • I've got to have ...

  • into a Brotherhood of Man

  • into a Garden of Eden

  • Key Concept: Delusions

    Errors, Illusions, Hallucinations, Delusions:

    A simple error or a mistake isn't always an illusion or hallucination or delusion. You can be tired and adding a series of numbers and make a mistake. Or you can hear it will rain today and believe it and be wrong.

  • Longer observation 015: Bad or Mentally Ill?

    Longer observation (15): Is he Bad or Mentally Ill (or Both)?: In these modern times we hear people discussing people who have done something bad. One person says, "He's just bad! No excuses! He should be punished!" and the other person says, "No! He's mentally ill! You would have done the same thing if you had been through what he has been through! We should be compassionate!" The person in question could be a criminal on trial or a political tyrant or even a family member who is hurting and, maybe, tyrannizing, people within the family.

  • Longer observation 020: Limitations of the DSM-5

    Longer observation (20): Limitations of the DSM-5: Whether or not the newest edition (Fifth Edition) of the Diagnostic and Statistic Manual for mental illnesses is an improvement over the Fourth Edition is being debated within the mental health professional community. Which ever side of the debate we find ourselves on, perhaps we will agree that any attempt to categorize mental illnesses has inherent limitations. We use the image of a building with windows to demonstrate the point.

  • Longer Observation 021: Deep Cures

    Longer Observation (21): Deep Cures: Traditional wisdom says that the Lord heals, not doctors. In our times, when medicine is charging ahead recording remarkable successes in its crusade against suffering, is there any place for this old wisdom? In discussing this question I will be focusing on psychological suffering.

  • Mentally Ill

  • narcissistic focusing on the self

  • on Mental Health

  • Paradox 9: Thinking, Depression, & Cheerfulness

    (Psychological Paradoxes & Puzzles — 9)

    A Paradox regarding Thinking, Depression, & Cheerfulness

  • Short idea 061

    Short idea (61): The Jewish people, as a people, suffer from PTSD. This doesn't mean that every individual Jewish person has PTSD.

  • Short idea 132

    Short idea (132): Every family struggles with psychological problems to some degree (just as every family struggles with physical or economic problems to some degree). It is a matter of degree.

  • Short idea 144

    Short idea (144): One type of injury, like a cramp, can be helped by exercising it and by not giving in to it. Another type, like certain sprains, require the opposite. These require immobilization and no movement and are dependent on time to heal. It may be that sometimes these never heal; the best you can hope for here is to learn to compensate, to learn what movements to avoid aggravating the injury. There are also these same two types of psychological wounds and the same two types of psychological healing.

  • Short idea 163

    Short idea (163): More important to me than coming up with a psychological diagnosis (from the DSM-5 (Diagnostic and Statistic Manual, 5th Edition) is to answer the question whether or not the patient can get better and how.

  • something inside

  • something outside

  • to my original nature

  • To Troubled Readers

  • waking up—feeling reborn

Two Approaches to Understanding Psychology

via reflection on the world
via reflection on one's immediate experience
Close




   the One   the Whole
the Sacred
the Ordinary
People
Action
Experience
Consciousness
Universals
feeling stuck
feelings of failing,        of dying
waiting
 waking up — feeling reborn
   focusing   on the self
confronting the   unconscious
the whole person
living in multiple       worlds
learning about     the world
feelings of success,     of the good life